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API:Introduction

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Roll20 API

Getting Started


Reference


Cookbook (Examples)


Community Scripts


The Roll20 API provides a powerful way to customize and enhance your game. You write scripts (little pieces of code) that tell Roll20 what to do during gameplay (for instance, move a piece, add a status marker to a token, or even roll dice). It's simple and straightforward to get started, but the possibilities are endless.


What do I need to get started?

Scripts for the Roll20 API are written in Javascript. You only need a basic understanding of the language to get started, but if you want to learn more about Javascript, this Codecademy course can help teach you.


How does it work?

You write scripts that listen to events that happen during the game. Scripts can check to make sure that rules are followed, change properties on objects and tokens, and even provide custom chat commands. The scripts you write run across the entire game, and affect things the GM does as well as all the players. Advanced scripts can also run independently, performing automatic actions such as moving a token on a patrol route or nudging players when their turn is taking too long.

To get started, your first stop should be the Use Guide.


Where can I find pre-made scripts?

The API Script community is fairly active with members creating and discussing scripts all the time. There are 3 basic places to look for new scripts:

  • The Official Roll20 API Script Repo on Github. This is where you'll find the current version of scripts that authors have submitted for inclusion in the repo.
  • The Roll20 API Script Forum. This is where scripts tend to show up first and where discussion happens about scripts that are being written or need changes. This is also where you can post and ask for help from the community in creating a script you've thought of, or finding a script to fill a need.
  • The Wiki's API Script index. This is a good source of information about some scripts, but it's not kept very up-to-date. However, if you'd like to document some scripts you find useful, their authors would certainly appreciate it!